Have a Heart for Kids Day rally, 2015

Hunger

Have a Heart for Kids Day 2018

This event is free and includes lunch. Children are welcome and encouraged to participate. Children must come with an adult who is responsible for them throughout the event.

Learn, Love, Lead! e-mail series

In our Learn, Love, Lead! email series, we show what we can do together to protect and support Washington's children from new federal threats. Each week, we provide a resource you can learn from and share, or an action you can take to be the leader kids are counting on.

Tips for Advocacy during Special Session

We recently gathered our thoughts about what works to persuade lawmakers to act in kids’ interests over the course of special session. Now that the Legislature has begun its special session to complete its work on the two-year budget, we share these three tips in the hopes that they can help us all be more effective advocates for kids.

Our 2017 Legislative Agenda

The Children’s Alliance creates our annual Legislative Agenda with the aid of a racial equity policy analysis, so that our efforts address disparities facing children and families in communities of color.

Early Learning

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What we do for kids now

This year’s election will bring immense change to our nation and our state. Because we know you love kids as much as we do, we want to take a moment now to share our initial thinking about the impacts of the election on children and on our work as child advocates. 

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2016 Legislative Review

This past session, the Children’s Alliance fought for policy solutions rooted in our commitment to improve the lives of Washington’s children and advance racial equity, so every child has the opportunity they deserve.

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Good jobs: A great way to end childhood hunger

 

The Children’s Alliance has endorsed Initiative 1433 for a higher minimum wage and paid sick leave all across the state of Washington.

Why YES on 1433? Here’s why. 

KIDS COUNT Data Center chart: Children in Poverty by Race/Ethnicity

Children’s Alliance staff, volunteers and community partners recently re-imagined the future of our work to end childhood hunger. Among our conclusions were these: One way to fight hunger broadly, as well as improve the health, well-being and learning of Washington’s kids, is by erasing disparities across race and ethnicity. And, good jobs are a great way to end hunger.

Higher wages and access to paid sick leave stabilize families and help kids grow up healthy and strong. Approximately 1 in 5 children in our state live in poverty and face long-term barriers to success in school and in life. As this chart shows, Washington’s children of color are more likely to experience poverty than are White children. That’s because the adults in their households have fewer opportunities to work in the good jobs with benefits that are the cornerstone of American prosperity.

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Vote YES on Initiative 1433: Raise Up Washington


Better wages and access to paid sick leave stabilize families and help kids grow up healthy and strong. One in five children in our state live in poverty and face long-term barriers to success in school and in life. Family-friendly workplace policies move us closer to ending childhood hunger and poverty. When crafted well, such policies are also a step toward racial equity, as people of color disproportionately hold low-wage jobs without paid leave benefits.

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Our Statement in Response to Governor Inslee’s Executive Order


Governor Inslee’s Executive Order re: State Blue Ribbon Commission on the Delivery of Services to Children and Families 

Statement from Children’s Alliance, Feb. 18, 2016

Any structural change in the state of Washington’s service delivery for children should be guided by what’s best for kids. And, when not all kids are faring well, our attention and resources should prioritize the most vulnerable. Data about child outcomes in our state show wide disparities in economic security, educational, and health outcomes by family income and race and ethnicity.

Raise Revenue: Our Tax System is Endangering Kids

All children deserve a great start in life. But our state’s tax system puts too many of them in harm’s way.

Revenues as a proportion of the economy have shrunk over the past 15 years, resulting in cuts to basic services. Children in communities of color have been disproportionately impacted by these cuts.

Ending these cuts boosts our economy. Ending the 25 percent cut to State Food Assistance would generate more than $17 million in economic activity through June 2017.

Breakfast After the Bell

Washington ranks 41st out of 50 states in reaching low-income students with nutritious school breakfasts. Without a healthy breakfast, a student’s chance of success is drastically reduced.

The good news is there’s a solution: Breakfast After the Bell incorporates the most important meal into the school day – just like lunch!

Serving breakfast in the cafeteria before the school day starts presents many obstacles for kids and families. Bus and carpool schedules, social stigma, and peer pressure prevent kids from eating school breakfast at that time.

Restore State Food Assistance

Washington’s success depends on great educational outcomes for all children.

But one in 5 Washington children lives in a household that doesn’t have enough food to get by. It's hard to learn when you are hungry. That’s why more than one million Washingtonians receive federal food stamp benefits, and approximately 15,600 legally residing immigrants use State Food Assistance (SFA).

Hungry in Washington 2014


For the first time since 2008, our state's rate of hunger matched the national rate. However, the rate of hunger continues to be significantly higher than before the recession. The Children's Alliance estimates that 305,000 children live in food-insecure households. Read our report.