Children's Alliance News Feed

Our support for Seattle early learning initiatives


We applaud Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn and the Seattle City Council for their visionary early learning proposals.

The combination of universal voluntary preschool for all 3 and 4 year old children with high quality child care and parent support could significantly improve the odds of school and life success for Seattle’s youth.

Support is broad for infants, toddlers, preschoolers

 

It’s not just sound science to give kids under age 5 the chance to build a foundation for future learning. It’s also good politics.

A bipartisan research team recently found overwhelming support for ensuring that children gain the knowledge and skills necessary to start kindergarten off on the right foot.

Researchers polled 800 voters across the United States, outlining the broad contours of a federal proposal to help states and local communities expand early learning programs for children ages birth to 5. Voters’ responses revealed two encouraging facts:

Stronger Together: Our Work in the 2013 Legislative Session


Our 2013 Legislative Report describes the Children's Alliance's work for kids in partnership with coalitions and individuals from all across Washington state.

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Together, our teamwork over the 2013 session won:

  • Equitable health care: we strengthened Apple Health for Kids so that it now offers affordable coverage to all children;
  • Quality pre-K: we expanded the Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program so it meets the early learning needs of more children;
  • Food for kids: we won a partial restoration of food stamp benefits for thousands of children and immigrant families.

Four Facts about Food Stamps


Congress is considering deep cuts to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, also known as food stamps), our nation’s number-one defense against hunger. Policymakers representing Washington’s 1 million SNAP recipients, 39 percent of whom are children, should consider these four facts as they ponder a vote:

The evidence mounts: a workforce solution can get more kids dental care


We congratulate our state’s legislators for making progress on oral health in the 2013-15 biennial budget. State lawmakers passed a budget that restored full dental benefits to adults on Medicaid.

Reversing that harmful cut means dental coverage for 700,000 adults. That’s a good step forward. But our oral health crisis is far too big to solve in one step.

That’s why we’re taking action, this summer, to call attention to a proven solution to get more kids and families the dental care they need.